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20130115
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Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
development and education. additional funding also provided by mutual of america, designing customized, individual and group retirement products. that's why we're your retirement company. the jane henson foundation. and the corporation for public broadcasting. welcome, i'm bob abernethy. it's good to have you with us. final preparations are underway in washington, d.c., for the second inauguration of barack obama, taking place on monday, martin luther king, jr. day. the benediction will now be given by the reverend luis leon of st. john's episcopal church, where the obamas sometimes attend services. leon replaces evangelical pastor louie giglio, who bowed out after controversy erupted over a sermon he gave in the 1990s condemning homosexuality. myrlie evers-williams, widow of murdered civil rights leader medgar evers, wildeliver te iocation anthe brooklyn tabernacle choir will sing. >>> this week, many religious groups praised president obama's newly announced measures to try to reduce gun violence, particularly his call for mandatory background checks and a ban on assault weapons. vic
networking. here's author and educator lou heckler. >> there was this story in our local paper a while back. a married couple was sitting on a love seat in their home, virtually knee-to-knee. each had a laptop computer and they were typing. the interviewer asked them what they were doing. the answer: "we're arguing about something and we're doing it so our friends can be part of the discussion." is that really connecting in the way all these social networks are supposed to help us do? funny, isn't it? we have the power to be more electronically networked than ever before, but are we really connected? when we ask someone today if they have lots of friends, do they answer with actual, physical friends or electronic friends? i'm not in the 25-35 demographic, so maybe i see things differently. to me, connection comes from finding an area of common interest; exploring that interest with others and physical contact with one another. if i read something online about a friend and want to talk with them about it, i call them. i want to hear their voice, feel their emotion, share their joy or pain. i
women here are getting education much more than -- sometimes more than boys. the fact that women are falling behind in the workplace that has to mean that their life circumstances are such that they cannot do -- go beyo part-time work so i totall agree with the congresswoman, i think that you have to -- the government, the state has to prepare the ground for these women to achieve the maximum that they can. >> but i think another take on that is that the woman that worked in corporate america for very long time i found women in managerial positions won't hire other women. i find sometimes we're biased on each other in hiring qualified women. >> i don't agree with that. i am running a nonprofit organization -- >> i understand. >> with 500 women in it. i have also worked in america for the past 30 years, i don't think women are women's worst enemies, i think that is -- >> there's some of them. but they're not in the majority. >> i don't think they're the majority, i'm giving a different take on it to add to it the reason why we're not -- i've seen some women with sharp elbows they
america. others point to our inferior infrastructure and sub-par public education. but adam segal, author of "advantage," says the big problem is others are gaining ground. >> we have been kind of running in place for the last three or four years because of the recession, spending on r&d, and big ideas seem to be fairly scarce while china just continues to funnel more and more money into it. >> reporter: still many argue the u.s. will always be extremely competitive because we are t most innovative country in the world. what better place to witness innovation at work than at i.b.m. in westchester county, new york. this is the home of watson, big blue's super computer. watson was clever enough to beat "jeopardy" champions at their own game just a few years ago. now, i.b.m. researchers are working on new uses for the brainiac computer, particularly in the field of medicine. bernie meyerson calls himself i.b.m.'s head geek. he says innovation is critical for companies and societies to survive and thrive. and yes, there is a magic ingredient. >> continuity. in the down cycles of the economy,
actions that run the gamut from improvements to the way background checks are run, more education for -- around the issue of mental health, more money for putting police and armed security in schools, something the n.r.a. has supported in the past. but the headlines are really about the reopening of this gun debate which has been dormant since 1994. >> rose: joe scarborough, do you believe that the time has come and that because of joe biden, because of michael bloomberg, because of former congressman gabrielle giffords that there is a possibility of doing something now or is it simply the possibility of beginning the conversation? >> the it seems like it was the beginning of a conversation that would end in failure even two, three weeks back. if you talked to people that were inside the white house and working with joe biden i don't think there was a lot of hope that they thought they could ever get through an assault weapon ban in the house and the senate. for actually, though, it's not been michael bloomberg's actions over the past several weeks or gabrielle giffords or joe bid
parents in jail. >> you do not go into education to teach children reading and writing. before all else, we must show them that there is another way to live. >> from local it -- for local teenagers, life in the high-rise estates tends to be bleak. they are all too aware that taking a stand means taking a risk. >> at one concert, the audience yelled "viva la camorra" at us. another time, i was pretty scared when does from a gang decided they had to show us how great the camorra is. fortunately, nothing happened, and we had to carry on. >> the band has made a name for itself beyond labels. they all still live with their parents. they cannot yet make a living with their music, said they take jobs, but they are working on their next album. their fight continues. >> we europeans love our islands. they are among our favorite holiday destinations, but in our new series, we want to take you off the beaten track and to places that have more to offer than beautiful coastlines and resorts. our first report takes us to croatia. >> the day begins early. in winter, the island is almost deserted. only
for education. >> absolutely. >> rose: stupd for women, even though she was 13413. >> sure. i think she was more effective than practically any other military operation, even, in how she gathered the sentiments and the emotions and just all pack stains, almost, unanimously, all pakistanies other than barring one or two sort of fringe elements who like to believe this to be a conspiracy. and she presented it in a very simple wayment she presented, i'm not saying-- when i say presented mi saying considered, presented it in a simple way. >> by her own personal actions. >> absolutely it was the malawa, pakistan, why a 14-year-old had the guts to stand up for her right to education. and the pakistan of the people who attacked her, okay, who felt threatened by a 14-year-old ability to stand up for her right today case so you can imagine what mind-set. so i therefore believe that any political party, any political leader or anyone in pakistan who increasesed ideaological space for these people to be able to operate isnot, you know, looking in pakistan's national interest. is not serious about sort of d
thought here's where i differ. here's where i don't. i thought it was really educational and very provocative. >> ifill: did this president come across a chastened second-termer or an ambitious one in >> he came across different to me. missing from the president was what i had seen several times during the campaign and in the presidency in recent years there was sort of a pet lance. there was a pursed lips look. that was missing. this is a happy warrior. i thought a far more appealing figure in that sense. there seems since the 6th of november to be a sense of resolution about him. he seems more certain or sure-footed than he had been in the past. i can't imagine the president i heard today doing what he did on health care, turning it over to the congress for a year to work its will in the committees and back and forth. i mean this is somebody who is a lot more forceful executive i'd say >> ifill: maybe that's what informed... when he was quoting jefferson and saying that our truths are self-evident but not self-executing >> which is one of the best lines. he was constrained for t
. and the user interface is far more suitable for places like offices, hospitals, educational establishments. and possibly new international markets. >> reporter: he wouldn't say if that includes the u.s. but you have to wonder why costa would bother with this huge u.s. retail trade show, if it didn't have plan brewing. erika miller, "n.b.r.," new york. >> tom: we continue our monday series with some of the nation's top universities to bring you the best research on business, the economy and investing. we call it "nbr-u". our partners combine over 400 years of business knowledge-- harvard, stanford, wharton and vanderbilt universities. every monday we speak with top professors about key money issues. and you can read in-depth articles at: www.nbr.com, just look for the "nbr-u" tab. tonight: money market funds. from small investors to giant pension funds and big corporations: more than $2.5 trillion are in money market accounts. but, as the credit crunch illustrated, one important difference is what those funds are invested in. we spoke with robert pozen, senior lecturer at harvard business
safe. it does education. it does programs for the children, for the elderly. so what you refrench in government you cut the good which in many respects is a bad. i mean is there a lesson here for the national government and the national politician? >> well, the lesson is one that you've got to make tough choices. you have to live within your means. that means you have to not do everything you want to. but you also have to raise more money. we did raise a tax on all citizens called the salesax, a quarter ofent. and we raised the tax on individuals who make more than $250,000 or couples who make more than $500,000. so that's what we did. there's no doubt america is overcommitted. we're overcommitted abroad with our several hundred drid military installations. we're overcommitted in our borrowing 40 cents for every dollar. >> reporter: answer me a question about the ideology and the gridlock between republican and democrats? it seems to be parallel to what's goi onn the uned statescongss at the same time. >> well, in california through the initiative process, the republicans refused
much he's learned. he's had the ultimate washington education so we see two changes in him. one is the philosophical change we've been talking about. this is the president who didn't always say what he really thought in the first term. when there were terrible storms that leveled parts of missouri he flew down there and he gave consoling speeches in which he talked about thosetorms as acts god which really angered some of the climate advocates because they said how can you talk about this like an act of god when we believe that this is linked to climate change and we can do something about it? gun control. this is a president who did very little on gun control in his first term and within hours of the newtown shooting you could see how that changed. he came out and made that first statement and you said to yourself this is a president who's going to try to do something about gun control. the second questn isow much smarter he's gotten about the washington maneuvering. the white house did do a better job at playing out the recent series of debt and budget negotiations. the quest
counsel tree that will be america, whether it's education or training or whatever else. i just wanted to give just shout out to the brooklyn tabernacle choir. which i thought was just phenomenal. also lamar alexander, which was really exceptional and the -- not that the others weren't fine but they were. i thought the poet was great. >> that gives us an opportunity to speak more broadly about the ceremony it wasn't just the speech. the speech is at the heart of it, we can come back to that. we'll watch the president, vice president, go in to a room in the capital which they're going to sign the four nominations to the people he has mentioned that he is going to nominate for cabinet. let's see if we can listen in. >> he's going right to work now. >> lamar alexander, chuck schumer, vice president biden. house speaker boehner. eric cantor and nancy pelosi. >> ronald reagan established the tradition of going right to sign these kinds of documents for nominations. >> thank you very much, everybody. >> thank you. [ applause ] >> at a time when we know that washington is divided by on
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)

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